The Bolo punch

The political economic and social climate in Pakistan is topsy turvy. Its longest serving prime minister was disqualified by the Supreme Court last week in a move that suspiciously came about when the CJ’s son was being accused of illegal actions. In the economic sphere, Pakistan’s industry has collapsed while imports continue to increase; circular . . . → Read More: The Bolo punch

The powers of bubblegum

It’s not just for chewing. You can use gum for everything from relieving stress to suppressing your appetite.

When we discovered that the secret to boosting memory, beating stress and curbing hunger was in our mouths the whole time, we couldn’t help but share the bubblegum with the rest of the class. At Greatist, we’re . . . → Read More: The powers of bubblegum

Beauty routines which can cause harm

Beauty health hazard 1: Eyeliner Eyeliner has been around for centuries and is popular with many women as a way to frame eyes and make them stand out. However, although in most cases eyeliner is no cause for concern, applying any product so close to your eyes can come with its risks. Not only are . . . → Read More: Beauty routines which can cause harm

Facts you overlooked in the Mediagate scandal

The Arsalan Iftikhar affair has made history but for the wrong reason. It may be the only case that was based entirely on hearsay and yet the Supreme Court took it up. Even in its preliminary stage, the affair has so many intriguing aspects that an investigative journalist can explore and bring out a bestseller . . . → Read More: Facts you overlooked in the Mediagate scandal

The people of Gah

Reading the tale of a ‘modern village’ Gah, I was amazed at how each word painted a surreal picture of an ideal village. Was this village really in the same country and the same province as my village?

Gah happens to be the birth place of the Indian Prime Minister, Manmohan Singh. As a friendly . . . → Read More: The people of Gah

Science and our people

By Muhammad Hamid Zaman

Somehow, science and the Pakistani society have never really formed a bond. There is always a little tension, some suspicion and plenty of misunderstanding. Our suspicion does not help our ability to think rationally, analyse critically and innovate for the future. It would be unfair to say that the burden . . . → Read More: Science and our people

Breathing life into Afghan music

In a country where music was silenced in the name of Allah for five years, the beat is back and even rock shares the airwaves with the romantic strains of traditional Afghan songs.

The Taliban, who banned all music as sinful while they were in power between 1996 and 2001, are now waging an insurgency . . . → Read More: Breathing life into Afghan music

Pakistan’s massive loss of 209 runs

Nuwan Kulasekara and Suraj Randiv combined to vanquish Pakistan as Sri Lanka won the first Test by a massive 209 runs on Monday, their biggest win over their Asian rivals.

The tourists, set a near impossible victory target of 510, were bowled out for 300 just before stumps on the fourth day despite defiant batting . . . → Read More: Pakistan’s massive loss of 209 runs

Detect autism by a brain trace

A simple brain trace can identify autism in children as young as two years old, scientists believe.

A US team at Boston Children’s Hospital say EEG traces, which record electrical brain activity using scalp electrodes, could offer a diagnostic test for this complex condition.

EEG clearly distinguished children with autism from other peers in . . . → Read More: Detect autism by a brain trace

World’s 5 intrusive Supreme Courts

EGYPT

The court: 21 judges appointed by the president for life terms

Activism: Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court cemented its reputation as one of the world’s most active judiciaries on June 14 when it dissolved the country’s Islamist-controlled parliament, throwing the country’s electoral process for yet another loop. The decision followed a ruling in May that barred 10 candidates from the . . . → Read More: World’s 5 intrusive Supreme Courts