Will Pakistan be able to overcome its alcohol denial

(By Murtaza Haider) Consuming pork is sinful and forbidden in Islam. However, Islamic law does not prescribe whipping or incarceration to those who consume pork. The religious doctrine may prohibit certain behaviours and consider them sins. This does not make those acts a crime.

The Supreme Court of Pakistan has taken up the task of . . . → Read More: Will Pakistan be able to overcome its alcohol denial

West Africa’s Ebola crisis and IMF

In recent months, as the spreading Ebola emergency took center stage in Washington, the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) have pledged $530 million to help Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. And in October, at a special session with African leaders on Ebola during the IMF/World Bank annual meetings in Washington, DC, IMF Managing . . . → Read More: West Africa’s Ebola crisis and IMF

Saudi women’s eyes are too tempting for Saudi Arabia’s religious police

Saudi Arabia has announced that it has the right to cover women’s eyes—‘especially the tempting ones.’ “I love the looks of you, the lure of you The sweet of you, and the pure of you The eyes, the arms, and the mouth of you The east, west, north, and the south of you”—Cole PorterIt’s a . . . → Read More: Saudi women’s eyes are too tempting for Saudi Arabia’s religious police

Real reasons for Mubashir Lucman ban

On October 17 of this year, investigative journalist Mubasher Lucman was banned for life from television in Pakistan. The case was taken up suo motu by the judiciary and found that Mr. Lucman maligned the judiciary egregiously enough to merit a lifetime ban from appearing in any capacity on television. As he says, “I cannot even host a . . . → Read More: Real reasons for Mubashir Lucman ban

(Is Bangaldesh ready to hang Jamaat-e-Islami chief for his support to Pakistan in 1971

Nizami’s War Crimes Trial

The International Crimes Tribunal-1 is set to deliver the long-awaited verdict in the war crimes cases against Jamaat-e-Islami chief Motiur Rahman Nizami today, more than four months after the deferment of the judgment in June.

The alleged chief of the infamous Al-Badr force is facing 16 charges, including his role in . . . → Read More: (Is Bangaldesh ready to hang Jamaat-e-Islami chief for his support to Pakistan in 1971

Journalist gets taste of police brutality

Police tortures Dawn News’ Quetta reporter by dawn-news A journalist associated with DawnNews was beaten up by Quetta police in the early hours of Monday.

Personnel from the Industrial Police Station picked up reporter Hafeezullah Sherani from his residence at around 3 am and badly beat him up.

. . . → Read More: Journalist gets taste of police brutality

How USA managed to import extremism

Conservatives told America they were bringing democracy abroad. They imported extremism instead.

“ Today I’m going to speak in depth about another vital element of our strategy: our efforts to help the Iraqi people build a lasting democracy in the heart of the Middle East.” ~George W. Bush, December 12, 2005

Water is scarce in this . . . → Read More: How USA managed to import extremism

Pro-Israel US senate is the only requirement

 

(By Janet McMahon) With the House of Representatives expected to retain its Republican majority—currently 234 seats to Democrats’ 201—all eyes are on the Senate to see if Democrats can hold on to their 8-seat majority (10 seats if one counts Independant Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Angus King of Maine, who typically . . . → Read More: Pro-Israel US senate is the only requirement

No matter what, we will stay in Gaza

It has taken more than two weeks for Maliha Al-Ommor, 85, to return to her home in the village of Al-Fokhari, on the far eastern border of Khan Younis—but she is back.

She returned to a scene of devastation and destruction. Her son, Khaled Al-Ommor, watched his mother grieve as she looked at a 40-year-old . . . → Read More: No matter what, we will stay in Gaza

Modi’s India and the case of lost secularism

India, V.S. Naipaul declared in 1976, is “a wounded civilization,” whose obvious political and economic dysfunction conceals a deeper intellectual crisis. As evidence, he pointed out some strange symptoms he noticed among upper-caste middle-class Hindus since his first visit to his ancestral country in 1962. These well-born Indians betrayed a craze . . . → Read More: Modi’s India and the case of lost secularism