Threats from Fukushima’s Radiations

(By JOHN LAFORGE) We should be carefully monitoring the oceans after what is certainly the largest accidental release of radioactive contaminants to the oceans in history,” marine chemist Ken Buesseler said last spring.

Instead, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency halted its emergency radiation monitoring of Fukushima’s radioactive plume in May 2011, three months after the . . . → Read More: Threats from Fukushima’s Radiations

Ending Malaria

IN A dusty yard in Magagasi, a small village in eastern Swaziland, a man in surgical gloves draws Gugu Dlamini’s blood for the third time this year. The health worker lays a drop of it on a small plastic tray and adds a clear solution. The ritual is familiar. Every time a malaria case is . . . → Read More: Ending Malaria

Delhi struggling to battle Dengue

The Indian capital, Delhi, is in the grip of the worst outbreak of dengue fever in five years, officials say.

More than 1,800 cases have been recorded in recent weeks, compared to 1,695 cases for all of 2010. Five deaths have been reported so far.

. . . → Read More: Delhi struggling to battle Dengue

Pakistani Children living in Damaging Circumstances: Report

Only a minority of children are growing healthily in Pakistan, which is estimated to have more than half the children under the age of five to be stunted or wasted, says the Global Nutrition Report 2015 released on Tuesday.

The report has come at a time when the United Nations member states plan to adopt . . . → Read More: Pakistani Children living in Damaging Circumstances: Report

Why snakebite antidote is become scarce?

The world is running out of one of the most effective snakebite treatments, putting tens of thousands of lives at risk, warn experts.

Medicins Sans Frontieres says new stocks of Fav-Afrique, which neutralises 10 different snakebites that can occur in Sub-Saharan Africa, are desperately needed.

. . . → Read More: Why snakebite antidote is become scarce?

Health Efforts Need a Catalyst

Since 1990, the world has cut extreme poverty, child mortality and malaria deaths by half. We’ve nearly halved maternal mortality, and new HIV infections are down 40 percent. In countless ways, people around the world are living healthier, better lives than ever before.

There are many reasons for this progress. Technology has advanced. Economies have . . . → Read More: Health Efforts Need a Catalyst

Doctors in a Fix

Initially, seven doctors mustered up the courage to speak up about certain unidentified people blackmailing them through stolen social media and mobile phone data. Now, more women doctors and medical students have come up with complaints about being blackmailed by some unidentified people.

Dr Salman Kazmi, a complainant in the case, says over 200 women . . . → Read More: Doctors in a Fix

Pakistan’s Water Problem: 80% unfit for drinking

Pakistan Council for Research in Water Resources (PCRWR) on Tuesday told Senate Standing Committee of Science and Technology that not a single city of the country has 100 percent potable ground water, as 80 percent of it is unfit for drinking and injurious to health.

“A survey conducted in 24 major cities of the country . . . → Read More: Pakistan’s Water Problem: 80% unfit for drinking

No Polio Case Reported for a year in Africa

It has been one full year since polio was detected anywhere in Africa, a significant milestone in global health that has left health experts around the world quietly celebrating.

The goal had seemed tantalizingly close in recent years, but polio always managed to roar back, particularly . . . → Read More: No Polio Case Reported for a year in Africa

Role of Timing in an Epidemic Treatment

Last year, scientists launched a trial of an experimental vaccine against Ebola in Guinea. On Friday, they reported great news: The vaccine works well, providing remarkable protection just 10 days after injection.

“We have to stop and celebrate the fact that an innovative trial design was . . . → Read More: Role of Timing in an Epidemic Treatment