Is Microsoft saying goodbye to smartphone business

IT ENDED NOT with a bang, but a whimper. And a memo.

Today, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announced that the company would be scaling down its mobile phone hardware business. Nadella called the company’s dramatic course change a “restructuring.” He used phrases like “effective and focused” and “long-term reinvention and mobility.” But make no mistake: . . . → Read More: Is Microsoft saying goodbye to smartphone business

We were told but we did not act – cyber security

The seven young men sitting before some of Capitol Hill’s most powerful lawmakers weren’t graduate students or junior analysts from some think tank. No, Space Rogue, Kingpin, Mudge and the others were hackers who had come from the mysterious environs of cyberspace to deliver a terrifying warning to the world.

. . . → Read More: We were told but we did not act – cyber security

A new species of dino is found in Canada

The skull of a horned dinosaur that was previously unknown to scientists and was unearthed in Canada is actually a relative of the Triceratops, researchers this week.

The bones were found sticking out of a cliff along the Oldman River in southeastern Alberta about a decade ago.

. . . → Read More: A new species of dino is found in Canada

Drones monitor entrance exams in China

Chinese students sat the annual make-or-break university entrance exams on Monday, with officials deploying drones or high-tech radio surveillance trucks at schools across the country to try and curb increasingly sophisticated cheating methods.

Nearly 10 million students will sit the crucially important two-day exam, known as the gaokao — or “high test”.

. . . → Read More: Drones monitor entrance exams in China

A giant leap in medical science

A man has been able to control a robotic limb with a mind-reading chip implanted in his brain.

It allowed Erik Sorto, from California, to sip a drink unaided for the first time in 10 years.

The details, published in Science, reveal how complex bursts of electrical signals in his brain could be interpreted . . . → Read More: A giant leap in medical science

How close are we to Star Trek medical science

In the Sky1 series Critical, surgery often looks pretty similar to butchery. Is it feasible that medical science will ever reach the level it does in sci-fi shows and films from Star Trek to Prometheus, where the patient is simply laid out in a glass cubicle and repaired by what look like magical healing energy . . . → Read More: How close are we to Star Trek medical science

If drones can kill, robots can kill too!

It’s 6-foot-2, with laser eyes and vise-grip hands. It can walk over a mess of jagged cinder blocks, cut a hole in a wall, even drive a car. And soon, Leo, Lockheed Martin’s humanoid robot, will move from the development lab to a boot camp for robots, where a platoon’s worth of the semiautonomous . . . → Read More: If drones can kill, robots can kill too!

The shocking image on Google Maps

After an unsavory prank went viral recently, Google has suspended a program to let people make changes to Google Maps.

. . . → Read More: The shocking image on Google Maps

What would humans eat in the future

Richard Morgan, a writer in New York, is the author of a forthcoming memoir, “Born in Bedlam.”

For all its cross-cultural and technological prescience, “Star Trek” — the most prestigious science-fiction universe of all time — was absolutely awful when it came to food. Captain Jean-Luc Picard had the galaxy’s cookbook at his . . . → Read More: What would humans eat in the future

The bio-fuels bleak future

MAKING fuel from the solar energy stored in living organisms by photosynthesis is a tempting idea. It sounds inherently green, and so biofuel schemes—ranging from fermenting starch, to recycling cooking oil, to turning algae into jet fuel—have drawn more than $126 billion in investment since 2003, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), a research . . . → Read More: The bio-fuels bleak future