A giant leap in medical science

A man has been able to control a robotic limb with a mind-reading chip implanted in his brain.

It allowed Erik Sorto, from California, to sip a drink unaided for the first time in 10 years.

The details, published in Science, reveal how complex bursts of electrical signals in his brain could be interpreted . . . → Read More: A giant leap in medical science

How close are we to Star Trek medical science

In the Sky1 series Critical, surgery often looks pretty similar to butchery. Is it feasible that medical science will ever reach the level it does in sci-fi shows and films from Star Trek to Prometheus, where the patient is simply laid out in a glass cubicle and repaired by what look like magical healing energy . . . → Read More: How close are we to Star Trek medical science

If drones can kill, robots can kill too!

It’s 6-foot-2, with laser eyes and vise-grip hands. It can walk over a mess of jagged cinder blocks, cut a hole in a wall, even drive a car. And soon, Leo, Lockheed Martin’s humanoid robot, will move from the development lab to a boot camp for robots, where a platoon’s worth of the semiautonomous . . . → Read More: If drones can kill, robots can kill too!

The shocking image on Google Maps

After an unsavory prank went viral recently, Google has suspended a program to let people make changes to Google Maps.

. . . → Read More: The shocking image on Google Maps

What would humans eat in the future

Richard Morgan, a writer in New York, is the author of a forthcoming memoir, “Born in Bedlam.”

For all its cross-cultural and technological prescience, “Star Trek” — the most prestigious science-fiction universe of all time — was absolutely awful when it came to food. Captain Jean-Luc Picard had the galaxy’s cookbook at his . . . → Read More: What would humans eat in the future

The bio-fuels bleak future

MAKING fuel from the solar energy stored in living organisms by photosynthesis is a tempting idea. It sounds inherently green, and so biofuel schemes—ranging from fermenting starch, to recycling cooking oil, to turning algae into jet fuel—have drawn more than $126 billion in investment since 2003, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), a research . . . → Read More: The bio-fuels bleak future

The choice of the world leaders

For years, the well-connected world leader would use nothing but a BlackBerry to get their email on the move – and it is still Barack Obama’s phone of choice. He uses a model specially enhanced by the US National Security Agency. But the news earlier this month that the White House Communications Agency is testing . . . → Read More: The choice of the world leaders

Pakistan gets high speed data connectivity submarine cable

Trans World Associates announced today that it has joined a consortium of leading telecom companies to build and operate the SEA-ME-WE 5 submarine cable network.

The Pakistan landing of SEA-ME-WE 5 will be owned and operated by TWA, its second international submarine cable landing in Pakistan. Currently Trans World Associates operates and owns TW1, . . . → Read More: Pakistan gets high speed data connectivity submarine cable

What next for the Samsung mobile division?

A lot of eyebrows were raised over the fact that the Samsung Galaxy S5 was a huge disappointment with regards to its sales performance. Understandably so, as it was considered to be the only phone in the market that could hold a candle to the iPhone. The year 2014 was not a very good one . . . → Read More: What next for the Samsung mobile division?

Warid first to launch LTE services

Warid Telecom, Pakistan’s most trusted and innovative mobile service provider, proudly announces the official launch of LTE services in Pakistan. Starting from December 26th, Warid customers will be able to enjoy 7 days of free customer trials of LTE services in Lahore, Islamabad, Rawalpindi, Karachi, Faisalabad and Gujranwala.

Warid has always taken great pride on . . . → Read More: Warid first to launch LTE services