Objectivity in Journalism

The lines are blurring. And no, not in the Robin Thicke kind of way. The lines are blurring when it comes to journalism, social media, activism and everything in between.

Ironically enough, it was a Facebook status that led me to writing this piece. It was one of those situations where a person wrote a . . . → Read More: Objectivity in Journalism

Negotiating Bhuttoism from the past to the future

During the trial of his life, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto accused his accusers, “This attack on the 2nd of May was done by (Kasuri’s) opponents. I had nothing to do with it. I was not even mentioned in the FIR. I saved him from it … the public prosecutor has said several times that it was . . . → Read More: Negotiating Bhuttoism from the past to the future

Millennial blues in Pakistan

If you’re an upper-middle class Pakistani in your late or middle twenties, expect yourself to feel mellow after you check your Facebook in the morning. One’s news feed is bound to be full of pictures, statuses and updates of peers and acquaintances getting married, engaged or having children. You are bound to get perplexed. This . . . → Read More: Millennial blues in Pakistan

The restructuring of Muslim-majority states

The Middle East, once united under the bipolar slogan of ‘Islam versus Israel,’ is now facing internal fractures of faith. Islam no longer binds; it is making Muslims kill Muslims. And Muslims are intellectually ill-equipped to even understand what is happening to them. Any criticism of their mind is taken as criticism of Islam, which . . . → Read More: The restructuring of Muslim-majority states

A glimpse on Iqbal through Manto’s lens

I first came to translating Saadat Hasan Manto about two years ago, 2012 being celebrated as the birth centenary year of this literary lion. Partly intrigued by the Kashmiri roots I share with him, and partly disgusted by the neat pigeonholing done by literary critics, Manto could apparently only either be a realist of sex or partition.

. . . → Read More: A glimpse on Iqbal through Manto’s lens

The need for a compromise between the HEC and critical thinking

Why does one go to a university? This is a question very few of us ask ourselves even though all of us should.

Is it to guarantee employment, because global trends increasingly show that no amount of education offers up such airtight assurances, especially in Pakistan, where more and more students find themselves jobless.

Is . . . → Read More: The need for a compromise between the HEC and critical thinking

Invoking Morality in Progressive Pakistan

THE relationship of morality to politics has occupied philosophers the world over since time immemorial. While the ideas of Western thinkers such as Machiavelli and Kant have gained universal acclaim, non-Western philosophers have grappled with such questions for as long, if not longer, than their Western counterparts. Gandhi’s reflections, for instance, build upon a line . . . → Read More: Invoking Morality in Progressive Pakistan

Can lawyering be used to entrench social and economic rights?

(By CHRIS JOCHNICK) Mahatma Gandhi called poverty the greatest form of violence. The global toll of avoidable, man-made poverty—thousands dead every day, billions sick and hungry—represents a blight on the human rights movement. Yet mainstream human rights have long turned a blind-eye to poverty, focusing instead on a small group of narrowly conceived civil and . . . → Read More: Can lawyering be used to entrench social and economic rights?

An original Pakistani documentary

A historic documentary about new born nation showing Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah seating cabinet meeting and Mr. Liaqat Ali Khan dictating official about state policy about relationship with world.

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