Can Bangladesh fall into the hands of Islamists?

The assassination of two liberal bloggers in quick succession in February and March raises some very disturbing questions.

First was that of Avijit Roy, a Bangladeshi-American, who came to attend the “21st February” book fair where a couple of his books were on sale. Machete wielding assailants killed him while his wife Rafida Bonna was . . . → Read More: Can Bangladesh fall into the hands of Islamists?

A bloody ascent

Now at the centre of an international struggle for power over the region, the Houthis initially began as a theological movement preaching peace. Though their slogans embodied Khomenian ideas such as “God is Great, Death to America, Death to Israel, Curse on the Jews, Victory to Islam”, the focus of the movement remained . . . → Read More: A bloody ascent

A call for introspection

Jinnah’s speech on August 11, 1947 that is often quoted, widely circulated on social media and sometimes even naively used to argue that the Islamic State of Pakistan in fact endorses religious diversity and does not have an inherent bias in terms of its ideology and its policies is an outright negation of . . . → Read More: A call for introspection

The glaring double standards within the free speech debate

Dear liberal pundit,

You and I didn’t like George W Bush. Remember his puerile declaration after 9/11 that “either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists”? Yet now, in the wake of another horrific terrorist attack, you appear to have updated Dubya’s slogan: either you are with free speech… or you are . . . → Read More: The glaring double standards within the free speech debate

How the West lost in the Middle East

By Ambassador Chas W. Freeman, Jr. (USFS, Ret.)

The Collapse of Order in the Middle East Remarks to the 23rd Annual Arab-U.S. Policymakers Conference

Ambassador Chas W. Freeman, Jr. (USFS, Ret.) Washington, D.C. October 28, 2014

Will Rogers once observed that “when you get into trouble 5,000 miles from home, you’ve . . . → Read More: How the West lost in the Middle East

I am not yet born

I am not yet born; provide me With water to dandle me, grass to grow for me, trees to talk to me, sky to sing to me, birds and a white light in the back of my mind to guide me.

I could sense sheer terror for the first time: hiding in a small room . . . → Read More: I am not yet born

Islam has nothing to do with terrorism

Beheadings, stoning to death, blasphemy, conversion by the sword, caliphate — words that have come back to haunt us from the Middle Ages. You just have to open a newspaper or watch TV and you read about the Boko Haram in Nigeria, the Taliban in Pakistan and Afghanistan, the Islamic State of Iraq . . . → Read More: Islam has nothing to do with terrorism

Should Pakistan be worried about ISIL

Officials in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) recently recovered pamphlets published by the “Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant” (ISIL), media reported September 3, and many segments of society are condemning the group’s forays into the country.

The 12-page booklet, titled “Fateh” (victory), is published in Dari and Pashtu. Copies of it have appeared in parts . . . → Read More: Should Pakistan be worried about ISIL

Murder report – when the law fails to protect the minorities

Pakistan, a state built for Muslims but very much inclusive of other ‘minorities’ has on many occasions breached this notion which has led to the society now becoming increasingly intolerant of the ethno and religio-ethnic minorities present within Pakistan. News have been infiltrated with the wave of Shi’i genocides of the Hazara in Baluchistan, Shi’i . . . → Read More: Murder report – when the law fails to protect the minorities

What makes Tahirul Qadri tick

By Gen Aslam Beg

Tahirul Qadri suffers from an acute sense of anomie. He thinks that the social order is rotten, to be demolished and a new structure is to be raised. He claims to have the plan, to build such an utopian order. Therefore he declared “I am coming, at the peril . . . → Read More: What makes Tahirul Qadri tick