KSA finally allows women to vote and run for office

One candidate wants more recycling. A rival envisions community centres with day care. How about creating Western-style public libraries? asks another.

These are hardly the rallying cries of revolutionaries. But, in the ultra-conservative context of Saudi Arabia, such appeals are breaking new ground: they are coming from some of the more than 900 female candidates . . . → Read More: KSA finally allows women to vote and run for office

Is Saudi Arabia an ISIS twin

Black Daesh, white Daesh. The former slits throats, kills, stones, cuts off hands, destroys humanity’s common heritage and despises archaeology, women and non-Muslims. The latter is better dressed and neater but does the same things. The Islamic State; Saudi Arabia. In its struggle against terrorism, the West wages war on one, but shakes hands with . . . → Read More: Is Saudi Arabia an ISIS twin

Saudi Arabia’s harsh laws endanger an old man’s life

A UK pensioner caught with homemade wine in Saudi Arabia could receive 360 lashes – a punishment his family say would kill him.

Karl Andree, 74, has already spent more than a year in prison since being arrested by Saudi religious police.

His daughter Kirsten Piroth told the BBC her father – who has . . . → Read More: Saudi Arabia’s harsh laws endanger an old man’s life

Post Hajj stampede Saudi popularity down in Pakistan

(By SALMAN MASOOD) For years, Saudi Arabia has had a hallowed status here, considered above question or criticism. Yet the hajj stampedenear Mecca last month has taken some of the luster off the exalted image of the kingdom.

Scores of Pakistani pilgrims were killed in the . . . → Read More: Post Hajj stampede Saudi popularity down in Pakistan

Why Sharif’s peace strategy has flaws

Since 1997 Nawaz Sharif has unflinchingly espoused the cause of peace with India. But vested interests and domestic political compulsions in both countries have never allowed his initiatives to come to fruition.

In 1997, Mr Sharif designed the composite dialogue with India’s Prime Minister Inder Kumar Gujral but the latter couldn’t sell Kashmir’s inclusion in . . . → Read More: Why Sharif’s peace strategy has flaws

Is Saudi Arabia falling into UK’s trap over Human Rights Council place?

Leaked documents suggest vote-trading deal was conducted to enable nations to secure a seat at UN’s influential body.

Britain conducted secret vote-trading deals with Saudi Arabia to ensure both states were elected to the UN human rights council (UNHRC), according to leaked diplomatic cables.

The elevation of the Saudi kingdom to one of the UN’s . . . → Read More: Is Saudi Arabia falling into UK’s trap over Human Rights Council place?

Is Saudi Arabia fit to lead UN Human Rights panel

The United Nations has been criticised for handing Saudi Arabia a key human rights role – despite the country having “arguably the worst record in the world” on freedoms for women, minorities and dissidents.

Critics, including the wife of imprisoned pro-democracy blogger Raif Badawi – sentenced to 1,000 lashes for blogging about free speech . . . → Read More: Is Saudi Arabia fit to lead UN Human Rights panel

How to eliminate Islamic State

(By Michael Doran, Michael Pregent, Eric B. Brown and Peter Rough) On June 10, 2014, a little over a year ago, the forces of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (IS) shocked the world by seizing Mosul, the second largest city in Iraq. The government in Baghdad watched helplessly as its security forces crumbled . . . → Read More: How to eliminate Islamic State

Recognising Dignity

(By NAWEEN A. MANGI) SINDH is home to a large youth population that is utterly frustrated, bitter and angry. They are also an incredible social, economic and psychological burden for their struggling families and impoverished communities.

The tale is similar all across rural Sindh. Farm workers who tend land owned by someone else aspire to . . . → Read More: Recognising Dignity

Is ISIS a mutation of Saudi Arabia’s Wahhabism?

The dramatic arrival of Da’ish (ISIS) on the stage of Iraq has shocked many in the West. Many have been perplexed — and horrified — by its violence and its evident magnetism for Sunni youth. But more than this, they find Saudi Arabia’s ambivalence in the face of this manifestation both troubling and inexplicable, . . . → Read More: Is ISIS a mutation of Saudi Arabia’s Wahhabism?