Chaudhry Aslam Shaheed: Pakistan’s hero

(By Faraz Khan) A year after the city lost its iron man, SP Chaudhry Aslam, the Crime Investigation Department (CID) has been unable to replace him.

SP Aslam was killed in a bomb blast on the Lyari Expressway on January 9 last year while he was on his way to work.

When the CID’s . . . → Read More: Chaudhry Aslam Shaheed: Pakistan’s hero

Realization – after the tragedy

Intense public outrage is forcing the government to step up its fight against terrorism.

Mohammad Hilal, 16, lies motionless on his bed in the Lady Reading Hospital in Peshawar. He is one of the survivors of the December 16 massacre at the Army Public School, which left 145 dead, including 132 children. Five young men . . . → Read More: Realization – after the tragedy

After Peshawar tragedy – State policy on terrorism

Three long, agonizing days have passed since the unspeakable events in Peshawar on December 16. As people everywhere grapple with a tragedy that is beyond comprehension, the one thing that unites all Pakistanis – indeed, all those who care for humanity – is the desire to do whatever it takes to fight back against the . . . → Read More: After Peshawar tragedy – State policy on terrorism

The civil military forced union

Or a change of heart

Years of stupor and inertia have been replaced with a collective sense of urgency to root out terrorism with ruthless use of state power. Is it a shotgun marriage brokered by the ubiquitous military or a real change of heart, only time will tell.

The army chief General Raheel Sharif’s . . . → Read More: The civil military forced union

The state’s gradual capture of the feminist narrative

The latest response to the attack on students in Peshawar has rekindled hypernationalist discourse in Pakistan, which in turn, is being strategically used by the State to fortify its own invincibility. Over the years, I have developed different coping mechanisms against this sort of hypernationalism in social media. Sometimes, I write rants on Facebook and . . . → Read More: The state’s gradual capture of the feminist narrative

Pakistan fights back

By Mina Sohail

Intense public outrage is forcing the government to step up its fight against terrorism.

Mohammad Hilal, 16, lies motionless on his bed in the Lady Reading Hospital in Peshawar. He is one of the survivors of the December 16 massacre at the Army Public School, which left 145 dead, including 132 children. . . . → Read More: Pakistan fights back

Pakistan’s leadership – Time to wake up

(BY ARSLA JAWAID) In what has now been termed Pakistan’s deadliest civilian attack, six members of the Tehreek-e-Taliban (TTP) stormed the Army Public School and College on Warsak Road in Peshawar on Dec. 16, leaving 141 dead, including 132 schoolchildren, most between the ages of 16 and 17, and many of whom were the children . . . → Read More: Pakistan’s leadership – Time to wake up

Death penalty – ‘Even one miscarriage of justice would undermine Pakistan’s position’

On the weekend, one major English-language daily carried a front-page picture of the dead bodies, still on the noose, of two militants that were executed in Faisalabad on Friday evening.

Another English-language daily’s front-page photograph was of a ‘national solidarity’ rally held in Karachi on Friday, called by the MQM to condemn the events in . . . → Read More: Death penalty – ‘Even one miscarriage of justice would undermine Pakistan’s position’

Turning grief into action: How Pakistan’s citizens face off the state’s demons

Death visited Peshawar on Tuesday, the 16th of December, 2014. It brought one of the gravest tragedies that the city had seen so far. The school massacre may have ended 141 lives, but it put a halt also to a far larger number of dreams. As opposed to the routine and custom condemnations that came . . . → Read More: Turning grief into action: How Pakistan’s citizens face off the state’s demons

Let us never forget

Pakistanis are a strange lot; we have witnessed more than our fair share of violence, extremism, dead bodies and devastation. While some believe we have become a brave and resilient nation in the process, there are others who fear that after being subjected to violence on such a large scale it has desensitized us. Today, . . . → Read More: Let us never forget