How Many Minutes Are In A Quarter In Football Tactics That Succeeded in Games of Junior Australian Football

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Tactics That Succeeded in Games of Junior Australian Football

Queensland has always been viewed as a “development” state in terms of Australian football by the southern states of Australia. The impression that comes from southerners is that Queenslanders involved in our national game are “newbies” when it comes to coaching. A book has been written about the most successful coaches in the Australian Football League. When I read about the tactics they used, I thought to myself, I use this or I have seen it in Queensland. Our players may still be developing, but our experienced coaches are the best out there. Our problem is that we are primarily in the role of developing coaching and developing tactics as well, compared to the southern states where they grow in Australian football.

Below are some ideas that I offer to young coaches who have worked for me over the years.

In the school grand final this afternoon I used a ‘dummy’ center half forward, encouraging him to move away from our two talented midfielders to give them space to get forward. This worked well and gave the midfielders more chances, but the ‘dummy’ centre-half had his best game. He was so excited by the prospect of playing in central midfield that his confidence grew and he played above his normal standards. The grand final, which ended at half time, ended up being an easy victory.

Your complete leader is usually a tall player. It means he had a good jump. So, often in the last five minutes of the quarter, I would change him to dance. Since he didn’t have to run like a regular runner, his energy was such that he was able to beat the opposing player and give us the first use of football.

Often good players want to play in their favorite position. In school and youth teams, this is often not the best position for the team. It is important to put your best players where the ball is most of the time. This means that the team gets a greater share of the football and the rest of the team gets more chances to get the ball. In 1968, in the Queensland state schoolboy team, we had the best defender in the Australian national schoolboy championship. But when the ball reached him, the opponents scored. The learned Victoria coach told me after two games that he was wasted at fullback. He didn’t have much of an impact on the game. So I moved him to center back to have a positive impact. He stayed there until the end of the carnival. (This player played many games in Queensland).

Another similar incident happened in the class “A” brigade of my school. Here I had a player who had won many awards during his junior career. His understanding of the game was excellent. So much so that he tried to attract other nearby footballers to the game and deliver the football to them. They did not succeed. So I told this player to move the football with long shots towards the man who was in the best position to score. This not only helped the team with victories, but also showed the players how to use the football better. This player played for two clubs in the VFL/AFL.

In 1967, as a 24-year-old, I was appointed coach of the Queensland schoolboys team to play in the Australian National Championships in Hobart. In 1966, Victoria beat Queensland by twenty wickets. I knew I had to do something to at least make us competitive. So I chose to have only one figure in the center with two rovers. The rover’s second job was to ride on its driver’s side. As a result, we managed to get most of the center shots.

To complicate matters for Victoria’s coaching staff, I was replacing more than five players as rovers and on the ball as well as four players as rucks. Typically, your two rovers rested in the front pocket, while your crane man rested in the other front pocket, and the second ruckman or rover in the center front rested in the back pocket, representing the opposition number. I have replaced all these players in many different positions.

We played the game as expected, but only lost by ten goals. The tactic was a kind of victory for me because Victoria’s coach, a man in his fifties, later told me that he and his coaching staff couldn’t do what I did. At this point, it is important to note that there was no sharing rule.

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