How Many Times Can A College Football Player Transfer The Top Ten Things Youth Football Coaches Do to Mess Up Their Teams

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The Top Ten Things Youth Football Coaches Do to Mess Up Their Teams

Back then, I was driving a lot for business. I often had to get up there at 3:00 or 4:00 a.m., have a series of meetings, and drive until 10:00-11:00 that night to maximize efficiency. Needless to say, it was hard trying to stay awake so I could channel surf and listen to the radio, the angrier it was, the easier it was to stay awake. There was a woman named Dr. Laura who I used to come across from time to time who published a somewhat popular book called Ten Stupid Things Women Do to Ruin Their Lives. Although the title of the book may sound harsh, it was right on target and included 10 very common but completely avoidable (common sense) things that women often do to destroy their lives. I’ve often thought there should be a book titled Ten Stupid Things Youth Football Coaches Do to Ruin Their Teams.

Common threads of failed teams

Unfortunately, there are a number of things that are often the common thread of poor youth football teams. After coaching 15 years in 6 different leagues and managing/managing several youth soccer teams, I have seen a bunch of bad youth soccer teams. I even took two years off from coaching to study the best and worst youth soccer programs not only in my immediate area, but around the country. While there’s certainly more than one way to skin a cat, there seemed to be a lot in common among the teams that were permanent residents of the bottom. These are teams that have consistently been at the bottom of the table year after year and have a real problem keeping players. It was painful to watch some of these teams practice and play, I really felt for the poor kids who had to play for some of these coaches, sadly it was obvious that many of the kids were playing what would be their last season of youth football. was In many cases, these teams had as much talent as I could imagine, but they were so poorly coached that they had no chance for individual success and little team success. While some of the coaches clearly meant well but lost, there were also many coaches who seemed to be very confident in their abilities and attitude despite their very poor results. While I could write volumes about why these teams did so poorly, I’ll try to give you my version of the top 10.

Ten things young coaches do to ruin their teams

10) Being too daring.

Some of these slow-working teams performed during half of the training and never performed the fiddling and bird breeding.

9) Excessive conditioning.

Most of these teams spent between 25% and 40% of their training time on non-football related conditioning exercises. These youth soccer teams would be great if they were competing in a state meet or artificial tournament, but when it came to playing soccer, they failed every week.

8) Poor Defense Plans –

These teams used defensive schemes designed to stop college football offenses and college or pro football players, not youth football games or offenses and youth football players. Let’s not even get started on the ones with the minimum rules of the game and how their defense doesn’t match the play of these players on defense in situations where they can perform and provide value to the team at any moment.

7) Blaming children.

Coaches blamed a lack of “effort” or lack of talent for the teams’ failure. Many of these coaches were “greener” guys. Coaches who think they have to have the best talent or size to compete. Any lack of success was attributed to the Jimmys and Joes’ situation, where their team was “unsportsmanlike”. Few of these coaches don’t take personal responsibility for the success of the teams, it’s always the kids, the refs, the weather. , timeouts, player sick, other team, cheating, dog ate homework blah blah blah

6) Lack of coaching effort.

While the typical youth football coach spends only 110 to 160 hours per season in practice, travel and playing time, many people do not spend an hour researching the best youth football coach. Less than 15% of youth coaches purchase coaching materials. When these poor coaches were asked about coaching materials, most did not know it existed and did not own any. The other flavor of the coaches kind of laughed that they knew everything they needed to know and, despite the constant success of their teams, they didn’t bother to own at all.

5) Stupid book.

These coaches’ books often looked like the top 25 games (or more) that the coaches saw on TV on Saturday and Sunday. There was no serial basis for these offenses, most plays stood on their own and were often paired with different formations. Other offenses included those who had no chance of success unless their team had a monopoly on the best talent in their league. These offenses didn’t match the talent or age of these respective teams. The playbooks often contained more than 40-50 plays, none of which were performed perfectly.

4) Absence of closure plans

Blocking plans are either non-existent or poorly taught. “Block the guy in front of you” seemed to be the main approach, but certainly not the plan or rule of blocking. None of these teams pull block, down, double team, trap, or even cross block. Blocking was clearly not a priority and was not usually left to the head coach.

3) Not teaching using progressions.

Many of these coaches played soccer, but they didn’t know how to pass on their knowledge to their players. In the end, it is important what the coaches know, it is important what the players know. These coaches did not know how to teach in progress and often tried to teach techniques that the average young soccer player would have very little chance of consistently performing well even if taught properly.

2) Learning age-appropriate techniques.

Many youth soccer coaches don’t know what average kids can and can’t do in certain age groups. Many coaches get frustrated because the average young player can’t do what a high school coach did at age 18 with 9 years of playing experience under his belt, not to mention his physical maturity and training schedule. annual, which most high school students are currently working on. Others (very few) ignore what can be done, yes kids ages 8-10 can run, trap, throw short passes, and play zone defense, but no, they can’t throw for 20 yards or block 9 equipment. .

1) Poorly “designed” practices/Poor priorities.

Too much standing around and speeding that makes a shade look like an Indy 500 car on race day. No wonder the kids are bored and they look like they didn’t practice much, they wasted most of the practice with lots of time gaps between exercises, repetitions and everything. Poorly planned and poorly executed experiments that reward wasted time. Instead of focusing on improving the critical success factors of developing youth soccer teams and players, emphasizing and spending valuable time on non-critical factors. Instead of improving technique, holding players responsible for improved technique, improving plans and developing players, time is spent elsewhere or wasted.

Please don’t be offended if you do any of these things. The reason I know this list so well is not only have I watched bad teams do all of these things, I’ve seen them do it myself until I saw the light 8 seasons ago.

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